Sermons and Talks

Daily Prayers and Reflection for April 2

offered by Rev. Elizabeth

Do You Have the Heebee-Jeebees?

“I’ve got the Heebee-Jeebees”.  That is a phrase I heard my mother say for nearly all of my life. She said it when she was feeling annoyed, or irritated. As young children, it was usually my brother and I who most often gave my mother the heebee-jeebees. When I did a Google search for the phrase heebee-jeebees, Dictionary.com said it is slang, used to express “a condition of extreme nervousness caused by fear, worry, strain; it refers to the jitters or the willies.” Perhaps that’s why I heard myself say, as recently as yesterday, “this Virus is giving me the heebee-jeebees.” I wonder if it is giving any of you the heebee-jeebees also?  I know you are all doing the best you can – trying to keep busy with spring cleaning, gardening, and with cooking and baking and all sorts of other things. These are all wonderful and productive things to do. But by now we all know that during this time of necessary isolation and staying at home, some days are better than others. Some days we can take it all in stride, but on other days when we feel agitated, worried and fed up with it all, we feel those heebee-jeebees pestering us. This well-known passage from the First Letter of Peter may help us to ward off the heebee-jeebees

Casting the whole of your care  – all your anxieties, all your worries, all your concerns, once and for all – on God;  for God cares for you affectionately and cares about you watchfully. 1 Peter 5-7

Cast Your Anxiety on God

 So often we feel heavily burdened by the pressures of our lives. No one else seems to understand, and most folks simply tell us not to worry—which convinces us that they really don’t understand. But here’s Peter, telling us that all those anxieties we struggle with can be handed over to God, because God does understand and does care for us, and wants to support us and help us with our struggles. Many times just knowing that someone else understands what we’re fretting about can be enough to ease the load.

“Here are my anxieties, my God who cares for me. I list them for you, one by one. Just naming them changes the way I feel and gives me a renewed perspective. I place each one of my cares into your hands, and I trust that you will help me deal with them. As I list my anxieties, I realize that I’m making more out of some of them than I need to, so I totally turn them over to you. Other problems may need more attention, and talking with you may help me have new insights about how to handle them. It truly helps to know that my problems are yours as well. Don’t let me try to handle them alone. Thank you for caring about me.”

God of compassion, be close to those who are ill, afraid or in isolation. In their loneliness, be their consolation; in their anxiety, be their hope; in their darkness, be their light; through him who suffered alone on the cross, but reigns with you in glory, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. (Church of England)